Doctoral Program

 

EdD in Instructional Leadership

Course of Study

The Doctor of Education (EdD) degree in Instructional Leadership prepares experienced educators to become effective practitioner leaders able to translate current research into policy and practice. The program prepares teacher leaders, department chairs, administrators and other education professionals to transform K-12 education, driving better educational experiences and outcomes across larger systems. The program provides clinically-focused doctoral training and a deep grounding in the research on educational practice, particularly as it applies to urban settings and suburban settings with increasingly diverse student populations. Students develop the ability to synthesize and apply new research to improve educational experiences and outcomes for students, and the skills to communicate their insights effectively as leaders in schools and communities

For a full list of requirements, progress standards, and exit requirements consult the Hunter College Course Catalog, Doctoral Student Handbook and Sample Course Sequence.

Course Catalog

Instructional Leadership (EdD) Course Catalog

Doctoral Student Handbook

Doctoral Student Handbook

Curricular Structure

The curriculum is structured into five distinct categories:

  • 15 credits for the Instructional Leadership Core (ILC)
  • 12 credits for the Research Toolkit (RT), which will serve as the critical and analytic foundation for all students
  • 12 credits of Research on Effective Practice and Curriculum (REPAC)
  • 12 credits of Special Topics courses that will deepen their knowledge of the field, standards of research practice, and the status of current work in the field. Depending on interest, special topic courses may be offered related to: 1) disciplinary subjects taught in school (e.g. literacy math, arts and humanities), 2) the learning process, or 3) other areas related to education and human development.
  • Finally, the dissertation sequence of 9 credits will introduce, support, and ultimately supervise a student’s production of original research in the field.

Sample Course Sequence

Year 1

Fall

Intro Doctoral Seminar (ILC)
Ed Policy & Reform (ILC)

Spring

Statistics (RT)
REPAC: Students with Disabilities

Summer

Family/Community Relationships (ILC)
Elective

Year 2

Fall

Qualitative Methods (RT)
REPAC Course

Spring

Quantitative Methods (RT)
Special Topics Elective or REPAC course

Summer

Special Topics Elective or REPAC course

Year 3

Fall

REPAC Course
Advanced Research course (RT)

Spring

REPAC Course
Special Topics Elective

Summer

Special Topics Elective

Students take a qualifying exam at the end of the third year to advance to dissertation candidacy. Once a student passes the qualifying exam, s/he will work with her advisor to plan and conduct the research required to complete a doctoral dissertation. If a student fails the qualifying exam, s/he will have one more opportunity to pass the exam. A student who does not pass the qualifying exam after the second attempt will be dismissed from the Program.

Year 4

Fall

Dissertation Introductory Seminar

Spring

Dissertation Advisement 1

Year 5

Fall

Dissertation Advisement 2

Spring

Dissertation Advisement 3

The Dissertation

Dissertation Committee

In consultation with his/her dissertation advisor and after a student passes the qualifying exam, a student selects two additional faculty members to serve on his/her doctoral committee. Two of the committee members must be Hunter College School of Education doctoral faculty members. The third member may be a faculty member outside the Hunter School of Education or outside of Hunter College. The third member must hold a doctoral degree or other terminal degree.

Dissertation Proposal and Defense

The dissertation proposal is a plan for the research that the student conducts for the dissertation. Many universities require the following format. The student writes a proposal with three sections: a statement of the problem that s/he plans to purse and justification for the proposed research; a review of the relevant literature and the theoretical framework that underlies the proposed research; and the research design and methods to conduct the research. The proposal also includes a bibliography and may include appendixes related to the methodology. Currently, Hunter College faculty members are considering additional formats for the dissertation proposal and will have additional information during the 2017-18 academic year.

In close consultation with the dissertation advisor, the student writes the proposal and may obtain feedback from other dissertation committee members. Once the student and dissertation advisor concur that the proposal is ready for review, the student sends it to doctoral committee members at least two-three weeks before they meet for the doctoral proposal defense, usually a two-hour meeting where the student and the committee discuss the proposal. After discussion, the committee votes to approve the dissertation, ask for modifications or reject the proposal.

Once your dissertation committee approves the dissertation proposal, the student is ready for the next stage of dissertation research. If the student is working with children, adolescents or adults, s/he must receive approval for the study with the Hunter College Institutional Review Board (IRB) (see next section). If the student is writing a philosophical, historical or policy oriented dissertation in which s/he does not collect information on/from people, the student does not need IRB approval. Once the student has received IRB approval, s/he may collect and analyze data, write up the findings and concludes with a section on discussion/implications of the research. All of the research should be conducted in close consultation with the student’s advisor and as part of the dissertation-advising seminar in which the student is enrolled.

The student and his/her advisor determine when a completed draft of the dissertation is ready to be sent to other members of the dissertation committee and the student and three faculty members determine a date for a dissertation defense hearing (at least two-three weeks after the student has sent the dissertation to committee members). At the dissertation defense, the student presents an overview of the dissertation, the committee members discuss the research and approve the dissertation, ask for modifications or reject the dissertation.